Last updated on: 1/27/2017 | Author: ProCon.org

Dan Goodin, MJ Biography

Title:
Security Editor at Ars Technica
Position:
Con to the question "Do Electronic Voting Machines Improve the Voting Process?"
Reasoning:

“With fewer than 24 hours before polls open for the 2016 US presidential election, consider this your periodic reminder that e-voting machines expected to tally millions of votes are woefully antiquated and subject to fraud should hackers get physical access to them.

A case in point is the Sequoia AVC Edge Mk1, a computerized voting machine that will be used in 13 states this year, including in swing states such as Arizona, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The so-called direct-recording electronic vote-counting system has long been known to be susceptible to relatively simple hacks that manipulate tallies and ballots…

[T]he hacks might be used to alter a relatively small number of results in swing states, where outcomes have been known to be decided by fewer than a few hundred or a few thousand votes. The hacks could also be used to sow widespread distrust in the official returns and undermine confidence in the legitimacy of the election.”

“US E-Voting Machines Are (Still) Woefully Antiquated and Subject to Fraud,” arstechnica.com, Nov. 7, 2016

Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Security Editor, Ars Technica
  • Former Reporter, The Register
  • Former Reporter, Associated Press
Education:
  • MJ (Master of Journalism), University of California at Berkeley
  • BA, English, University of Massachusetts
Other:
  • Twitter handle: @dangoodin001
Quoted in:
  1. Do Electronic Voting Machines Improve the Voting Process?