Last updated on: 6/3/2014 | Author: ProCon.org

Michael Hout, PhD Biography

Title:
Professor of Sociology at New York University (NYU)
Position:
None Found to the question "Do Electronic Voting Machines Improve the Voting Process?"
Reasoning:

No position found as of Aug. 23, 2006

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
    Experts
Individuals with JDs, or equivalent advanced degrees in fields relevant to electronic voting machine issues. Also top-level government officials (such as foreign leaders, US presidents, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court Justices, members of legislative bodies, cabinet members, military leaders, etc.) with positions relevant to electronic voting machine issues.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Professor of Sociology, New Your University, 2013-present
  • Editorial Board, Annual Review of Sociology, 2004-present
  • Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, 1988-2013
  • Elected to the National Academy of Sciences, 2003
  • Sociological Research Association, 2001-2006
  • Editorial Board, Sociology of Education, 2001-2004
  • Distinguished Graduate Alumnus, Indiana University, 2000
  • President, International Sociological Association Research Committee on Stratification and Mobility, 1998-2002
  • Board Member, American Sociological Association Council, 1997-2001
  • Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1997
  • Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Award, Population Association of America, 1996
  • Editorial Board, American Sociological Review, 1995-1998
  • Editorial Board, Research in Stratification and Mobility, 1989-1994
  • Executive Board, International Sociological Association Research Committee on Stratification and Mobility, 1989-1994
  • Elected to Sociological Research Association, 1989
  • Chair, Department of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, 1988-1991
Education:
  • PhD, Sociology, Indiana University, 1976
  • MA, Sociology, Indiana University, 1973
  • BA, Sociology and History, University of Pittsburgh, 1972
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Did Electronic Voting Machines in the 2000 and 2004 Elections Give an Advantage to a Particular Political Party?