Last updated on: 2/26/2008 | Author: ProCon.org

Richard L. Hasen, PhD Biography

Title:
Chancellor's Professor of Law and Political Science at University of California at Irvine
Position:
Con to the question "Do Electronic Voting Machines Improve the Voting Process?"
Reasoning:

“The point is not that electronic voting is the best system; maybe it should be scrapped. The real solution is to create a cadre of dedicated, professional nonpartisan administrators with enough money to run a scrupulously fair and voter-friendly system of election administration to resolve such questions.”

“Keeping the Voting Clean,” New York Times, Nov. 11, 2006

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
    Experts
Individuals with JDs, or equivalent advanced degrees in fields relevant to electronic voting machine issues. Also top-level government officials (such as foreign leaders, US presidents, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court Justices, members of legislative bodies, cabinet members, military leaders, etc.) with positions relevant to electronic voting machine issues.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science, University of California at Irvine, 2011-present
  • William H. Hannon Distinguished Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, 2005-2011
  • Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, 1998-2005
  • Visiting Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, 1997-1998
  • Professor, Chicago-Kent College of Law, 1994-1997
  • Civil Appellate Lawyer, Horvitz and Levy
  • Clerk, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Honorable David R. Thompson
  • Co-editor, Election Law Journal
  • Author, published in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Slate
  • Named one of the 20 top lawyers in California under age 40 and one of the top 100 lawyers in California by the Daily Journal, 2005
Education:
  • PhD, University of California Los Angeles
  • JD, University of California Los Angeles School of Law, Order of the Coif
  • MA, University of California Los Angeles
  • BA, University of California Berkeley
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Did Electronic Voting Machines in the 2000 and 2004 Elections Give an Advantage to a Particular Political Party?